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The marriage may be legal, he notes, but is it a wise choice?

Those are questions that may also need to be explored in marriage preparation.

“In addition, only with his permission can a person, other than a Catholic, receive Communion in church during such a wedding.” Catholic-Jewish Weddings Jews and Christians share a view of marriage as a holy union and symbol of God’s bond with his people.

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The Reform branch of Judaism strongly discourages interfaith marriages, but there is no legal prohibition against it as there is in the stricter branches.Often, a Catholic-Jewish wedding is held at a neutral site – with permission from the bishop – so that neither family will feel uncomfortable. The couple needs to have a dispensation from canonical form for such a wedding to be valid in the Catholic Church.Until recent decades, the idea of a Catholic marrying outside the faith was practically unheard of, if not taboo.Such weddings took place in private ceremonies in the parish rectory, not in a church sanctuary in front of hundreds of friends and family.“Conservative Judaism sees only the marriage of two Jews as …

a sacred event,” reported the USCCB’s Committee for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs, which discussed Catholic-Jewish marriages at a conference in November 2004.

If children are raised in another faith, he notes, “the Catholic parent must show children good example, affirm the core beliefs of both parents’ religious traditions, make them aware of Catholic beliefs and practices and support the children in the faith they practice.” The Wedding Ceremony Because Catholics regard marriage as a sacred event, the church prefers that ecumenical interfaith couples marry in a Catholic church, preferably the Catholic party’s parish church.

If they wish to marry elsewhere, they must get permission from the local bishop. This permission is called a “dispensation from canonical form.” Without it, a wedding not held in a Catholic church is not considered valid.

This provision of the 1983 Code of Canon Law is a change from the 1917 version, which required an absolute promise to have the children raised Catholic.

Likewise, the non-Catholic spouse is no longer required to promise to take an active role in raising the children in the Catholic faith, but instead “to be informed at an appropriate time of these promises which the Catholic party has to make, so that it is clear that the other party is truly aware of the promise and obligation of the Catholic party,” the code states.

Theologican Robert Hater, author of the 2006 book, “When a Catholic Marries a Non-Catholic,” writes: “To regard mixed religion marriages negatively does them a disservice.