riverside ca dating Dating antique coke bottles

From the standpoint of most collectors of antique bottles, the name and location of the company the bottle was made for, and the name of the product that was originally contained in the bottle (one or both of which may be embossed on the bottle) is often considered to be of more interest or importance than the glass factory where the bottle was actually manufactured.

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Hopefully this database will be of some help to those who are attempting to assign an approximate date range to a particular bottle, assuming it carries an identifiable glass manufacturer’s mark. Co.” Also, the abbreviation “Co” (Company) sometimes may be found embossed with either an upper- or lower-case “O” on various bottles made by the same manufacturer.

be a glass manufacturer’s mark and so may not be listed here. Many bottles carry only a number (or numbers) on the base.

These variations in punctuation were common and probably reflected the whim of the mold engraver, thus having little or no importance (i.e. Some numbers served as date codes, or as some other type of internal code used by the factory.

for assigning date ranges) especially on marks of pre-1900 bottles. In the great majority of cases, bottles with only numbers on the base are difficult, if not impossible, to attribute to a specific glass maker.

This list primarily includes marks that represent the actual glass company that made the container.

Many marks are encountered that indicate the company whose product was contained within it, or are trademarks (“brand names”) that give no indication of who actually made the glass, and those are (with quite a few exceptions) , not included in my list.

Ball Perfect Mason jars were made utilizing steel molds as part of “ABM” (“Automatic Bottle Machine”) i.e. Many different jar molds (thousands) were used over the many years’ time these jars were being produced.

Each mold was hand-cut (hand-engraved) with the lettering incised backward into the inside surface of the mold, which of course resulted in the embossing (raised lettering) which is seen on the surface of the jar.

The info presented on this site is the most accurate I’ve been able to find at present, but any comments (pro or con), clarifications or corrections (preferably backed up with , but please be aware that I’m not an appraisal service, and I may not respond to queries along the general lines of “what is this jar worth?

” and “is this bottle worth the hassle of listing on ebay? Generally speaking, I may not be able to answer questions concerning bottles with only mold or catalog numbers embossed on the base.

Other sources of information I have used (including reference books, magazine articles, websites, and in some cases, email or voice communications) would include: Helen Mc Kearin, Rhea Mansfield Knittle, Stephen Van Rennselaer, Harry Hall White, Alice Creswick, Dick Roller, William S. In the meantime, you might try an internet search for more information on these names……there is a wealth of information out there, with many books in libraries and/or online pertaining to glass history, antique glass collecting, glass container manufacturing, and related fields).