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“Acronyms used for this purpose could potentially raise some red flags for parents.” But parents would drive themselves crazy, she said, if they tried to decode every text, email and post they see their teen sending or receiving.

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) // And most of all, make it absolutely, totally clear that your child can ALWAYS come to you if they see something on the app that they don't know how to deal with!

I've heard stories of children being afraid to tell their parents about what they're dealing with because they don't want to get in trouble.

She says research shows that a majority of teens believe that their parents are starting to keep tabs on their online and social media lives.

“With that, acronyms can be used by kids to hide certain parts of their conversations from attentive parents,” Greer said.

Make sure they know what sort of things to look out for.

Make sure they can recognize when someone they are speaking with is acting inappropriately.

So “LMK” — let me know — and “WYCM” — will you call me? But the issue, especially for parents, is understanding the slang that could signal some dangerous teen behavior, such as “GNOC,'” which means “get naked on camera.” And it certainly helps for a parent to know that “PIR” means parent in room, which could mean the teen wants to have a conversation about things that his or her mom and dad might not approve of.

Katie Greer is a national Internet safety expert who has provided Internet and technology safety training to schools, law enforcement agencies and community organizations throughout the country for more than seven years.

“I announced my invention of a new acronym: ‘PYFPD.’ Put your freaking phone down.” LOL!

But back to the serious issue at hand, below are 28 Internet acronyms, which I learned from Greer and other parents I talked with, as well as from sites such as No and Net Lingo.com, and from Cool Mom Tech’s 99 acronyms and phrases that every parent should know.

“Asking kids not only gives you great information, but it shows that you’re paying attention and sparks the conversation around their online behaviors, which is imperative.” Micky Morrison, a mom of two in Islamorada, Florida, says she finds Internet acronyms “baffling, annoying and hilarious at the same time.” She’s none too pleased that acronyms like “LOL” and “OMG” are being adopted into conversation, and already told her 12-year-old son — whom she jokingly calls “deprived,” since he does not have a phone yet — that acronym talk is not allowed in her presence.